10/11/08

Barack Obama trained ACORN in Ethics

More ACORN stories: here collectivism: here Alinsky: here

Part Three of a series: "What did Barack Obama teach ACORN?"
Read the entire series: here

It's time for America to learn what Barack Obama knows

Before entering elective politics, Barack Obama was a community organizer and trainer for an ACORN subsidiary, Project Vote. Barack taught from the 1971 book 'Rules for Radicals', by the late socialist Saul Alinsky. In the photo above-left, Obama is teaching Alinsky's principles of "Power Analysis" and "Relationships built on self-interest" as seen written upon the blackboard [click photo to enlarge.] This post contains another selection from Alinsky's "playbook of the Left."

Let's find out more about the man expected to be elected President of the United States next month.

The selection, below, reveals:

• Community organizers employ the 'act now, think later' model of conduct.
• Community organizers believe that life is a corrupting process.
• Community organizers are revolutionaries who are not bound by ethical considerations that are normal to regular folks in our everyday interactions.
• "Hope" and "Change" are deliberate nostrums intended to mask unethical behavior.
• To revolutionaries like community organizers, it's all about power. The means always justify the ends.
• We should fully expect the Obama Administration to set new standards for unethical conduct.
excerpted from "Rules for Radicals", by Saul Alinsky: Of Means and Ends

We cannot think first and act afterwards. From the moment of birth we are immersed in action and can only fitfully guide it by taking thought. - Alfred North Whitehead

That perennial question, "Does the end justify the means?" is meaningless as it stands; the real and only question regarding ethics of means and ends is, and always has been, "Does this particular end justify this particular means?"

Life and how you live it is the story of means and ends. The end is what you want, and the means is how you get it. Whenever we think about social change, the question of means and ends arises. The man of action views the issue of means and ends in pragmatic and strategic terms. He has no other problem; he thinks only of his actual resources and the possibilities of various choices of action. He asks of ends only whether they are achievable and worth the cost of means, only whether they will work. To say that corrupt means corrupt the ends is to believe in the immaculate conception of ends and principles. The real arena is corrupt and bloody. Life is a corrupting process from the time a child learns to play his mother off against his father in the politics of when to go to bed; he who fears corruption fears life.

The practical revolutionary will understand Goethe's "conscience is the virtue of observers and not of agents of action"; in action, one does not always enjoy the luxury of a decision that is consistent both with one's individual conscience and the good of mankind. The choice must always be for the latter. Action is for mass salvation and not for the individual's personal salvation. He who sacrifices the mass good for his personal conscience has a peculiar conception of "personal salvation"; he doesn't care enough for people to be corrupted by them. [...]

I present here a series of rules pertaining to the ethics of means and ends: first, that one's concern with the ethics of means and ends varies inversely with one's distance from the scene of the conflict ...

The second rule of the ethics of means and ends is that the judgment of the ethics of means is dependent upon the political position of those sitting in judgment. ...

The third rule of the ethics of means and ends is that in war the end justifies almost any means. ...

The fourth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that judgment must be made in the context of the times in which the action occurred and not from any other chronological vantage point. ...

The fifth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that concern with ethics increases with the number of means available and vice-versa. ...

The sixth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that the less important the end to be desired, the more one can afford to engage in ethical evaluations of means. ...

The seventh rule of the ethics of means and ends is that generally success or failure is a mighty determinant of ethics. ...

The eighth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that the morality of a means depends upon whether the means is being employed at a time of imminent defeat or imminent victory. ...

The ninth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that any effective means is automatically judged by the opposition as being unethical. ...

The tenth rule of the ethics of means and ends is that you do what you can with what you have and clothe it with moral garments. ...

The eleventh rule of the ethics of means and ends is that goals must be phrased in general terms like "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity," "Of the Common Welfare," "Pursuit of Happiness," or "Bread and Peace."
(nwrepublican.blogspot.com)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Free speech, debate, and criticism are the rights that define the very spirit of America. I'm proud of that. I do NOT,however, defend your right to photo-shop pictures of candidates to illustrate a point. (Obama's falsified chalk line is even more obvious than the blurred and rewritten words.) FREE SPEECH is not the same as fabricated truth. Shame on you. Win on merit - NOT on slander. Honestly, shouldn't we all be better than that?

John Buck said...

to previous commenter..and "We the people" do not "defend" your right to socialize our country.

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